Watch North Korean Refugees Try American Barbecue For The First Time In This Viral Video

Its a must-ard watch

A Korean Barbecue Image YouTube

One thing we can agree on when it comes to Korea is that they know their barbecue. Korean barbecue or Gogigui, which translates to ‘meat roast’, is renowned for being a tender and delectable gastronomical experience.

Forms of gogigui range from bulgogi to galbi. The best-known form, bulgogi, is layers of thinly sliced sirloin marinated within an inch of its life and grilled to perfection. If it doesn’t melt in your mouth, then it’s not done right. Galbi consists of short ribs soaked in Korean soy sauce and placed on a hot griddle or grill. So good.

In a clip that has gone viral, Digitalsoju TV took on the task of introducing North Koreans to another form of famous barbecue, the American kind. Yee haw. They ate pulled pork, smoked chicken, brisket, burnt ends and ribs from grill-famous US states like Alabama, Texas, North Carolina and Kansas.

 

 

What’s unique about this particular video is that the people involved in the tasting are North Korean refugees who fled to South Korea. Therefore many of the usual condiments, such as mustard and BBQ sauce – which we know well and take for granted – were alien to them. 

“The concept of sauces is new to us,” says one taster.

 

 

Another cool aspect of this clip is the discussion of the inhumane eating practices in the totalitarian state of North Korea and the much more progressive South Korea.

Towards the end of the video, it gets real when one taster discussed the impact freedom has made on them and how they noticed food is so freely wasted in restaurants outside of North Korea. 

“We’d take our leftovers home and people would laugh and look at us like vagrants,” she remarked. 

Judging from how much they enjoyed the American fare, we’re pretty sure there were no leftovers this time.

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Loaded staff writer Danielle De La Bastide has lived all over the planet and written for BuzzFeed, Thought Catalog as well as print publications throughout the Caribbean.