This New Theory On The Speed Of Light Could Prove Einstein Wrong

Is everything we know about the universe wrong?

A new scientific theory
A new scientific theory Could this change our understanding of the universe? Image Getty Images

How would you react if you were told everything you knew about the universe was totally wrong?

Scientists at Imperial College London are busy working on a new theory about the speed of light which could disprove the work of Albert Einstein and redefine our understanding of the universe.

The speed of light is universally observed as 186,282 miles per second. However, the new theory claims that it hasn’t always been one constant speed.

As The Independent reports, the work could disprove all we know about general relativity and how the universe expanded after the Big Bang.

The theory was first suggested in the late 1990s, and could be proven in just a matter of weeks.

Scientists behind the theory are attempting to prove that light moved much faster immediately after the Big Bang, which could disprove all we know about general relativity and how the universe initially expanded.

“It could lead to a modification of Einstein’s theory of gravity.”

How are they going to prove it? By studying the cosmic microwave background (CMB) left after the Big Bang. When structures such as galaxies were created, it caused tiny fluctuations in the CMB, which is now being analyzed.

Professor Joao Magueijo of Imperial College London, said: “The theory, which we first proposed in the late 1990s, has now reached a maturity point – it has produced a testable prediction. If observations in the near future do find this number to be accurate, it could lead to a modification of Einstein’s theory of gravity.

“The idea that the speed of light could be variable was radical when first proposed, but with a numerical prediction, it becomes something physicists can actually test. If true, it would mean that the laws of nature were not always the same as they are today.”

The theory has yet to be completely certified, but it’s interesting to think that Einstein might not be as great as we first thought.

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Loaded staff writer Harry Fletcher has covered news, sport and entertainment for several major websites across the UK. Follow him on Twitter at @Harry__Fletcher.