Making A Murderer: Steven Avery’s sons speak out. Do they believe his innocence?

Steven Avery Jr and Bill Avery break their silence on the controversial Netflix documentary.

Steven Avery from Making A Murderer
Estranged father Steven Avery hasn't spoken to his twin sons in more than 20 years. Image Picture Netflix

The estranged sons of Making A Murderer’s Steven Avery have spoken out for the first time about their father’s case.

Twins Steven Jr and Bill Avery will both appear on FOX6’s Crime Watch Daily this evening, and offer up contrasting views on whether or not their father is innocent.

Avery was arrested and charged with the 2005 murder of photographer Teresa Halbach. Two years later he was sentenced to life imprisonment, while his nephew Brendan Dassey was handed a life sentence with parole opportunities beginning in 2048. 

The 25-year-old brothers revealed to Crime Watch Daily that they haven’t spoken to their father for 20 years.

Steven Jr admitted that he wasn’t convinced of his father’s claims of innocence were true.

“Only one person can answer that, and that would be Teresa Halbach. But she can’t answer it no more,” he said.

“The only thing I know is that the entire case was very shady. It’s clear that there was corruption.”

Bill offered up a more definitive response: “No, I don’t think he did it.”

However, Steven Jr stated that his father deserves a second trial.

“The only thing I know is that the entire case was very shady. It’s clear that there was corruption,” he said. “Him and Brendan deserve a fair trial. That’s my take on it: they deserve a fair trial. If they’re guilty let them sit, but if they’re free, get them out. It’s been ten years now. They’ve wasted going on 30 years of his life if he’s found innocent.”

Kathleen Zellner, one of the most highly regarded appeal attorneys in America, has taken on Avery’s case in a bid to free him.

Before being convicted of Halbach’s murder, Avery had previously served 18 years in prison for a wrongful sexual assault conviction. He was exonerated in 2003 when improved DNA testing matched another man to the crime.

During his first incarceration, Avery and his sons’ mother Lori were divorced after six years of marriage.

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Loaded digital media manager Simon Reynolds has written about film and entertainment for various leading websites since 2008. Follow Simon at @simonreyn

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