Look what they found at Pablo Escobar’s mansion

A second seemingly impenetrable safe has been discovered at the former Colombian drug lord’s Miami property.

Pablo Escobar's mugshot Loaded
Cartel creator Drug lord Pablo Escobar, whose story is currently laid bare in Netflix series Narcos, pictured smiling in his 1976 mugshot.

A safe has been discovered at the site of a Miami beach mansion formerly owned by Pablo Escobar.

Workers, who are demolishing the property in order for its current owner to rebuild on the land, made the discovery overnight.

The grey safe, which reportedly weighs somewhere between a whopping 40-50 stone, was found hidden underneath concrete as the last area of the mansion overlooking Biscayne Bay was levelled. Officials currently remain unable to gain access to its contents.

Christian de Berdouare, who bought the property with his wife Jennifer Valoppi in 2014, joked after the discovery of the safe that “Pablito is now my best friend”. When quizzed on the contents of the safe, Berdouare joked that he thinks it’s full of “gold or diamonds”.

Escobar was renowned for hiding profits, drugs and jewelry in his properties, infamously burying money during his time as a Colombian drug lord. And this isn’t the first discovery at the $10 million Miami Beach mansion, after a separate safe was discovered last week.

The previous find is now being investigated as theft, as it disappeared from the site before the owners gained access to it.

Valoppi said: “It was in the ground under some marble and was discovered by some of our workers. But, before we even had a chance to remove it, it was stolen. So we’ve been working with the police on that.”

Escobar, whose cartel was responsible for an incredible 80% of cocaine smuggled into the US at the height of his power, was killed in 1993 during a shootout with Colombian National Police in Medellín. His rise was chronicled in hit Netflix series Narcos last year.

His distinctive pink mansion was seized by the US government six years before his death, as they believed it to be used as a hideout for his henchmen, as well as a site to unload tons of cocaine as they smuggled it into the country.

Previous Post
Next Post

Loaded reporter Robert McCallum has written for many leading culture magazines and websites about music, sport, science, politics, fashion and arts. Follow Robert at @therobmccallum

contribute