The Future Of French Weed Is Looking A Little Brighter

A Macaron presidency could relax the stringent Marijuana laws

france weed
Weed is very popular in France... Image Getty Images

Now that the French elections are over, there is one vital question being posed: What’s going to happen to weed smokers?

Marijuana is the most popular illegal substance in France hands down. 1.5 million French nationals regularly light up, and 52% of the population say they would prefer the drug to be legalised.

High Times, the authority on all things green, decided to explore this topic further. Since the far-right candidate and weed hater Le Pen is out of contention, all red-tinged eyes are on Macron.

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Getty Images

Le Pen made it clear that cannabis legalisation was never going to happen, but Macron isn’t too sure.

The moderate politician is pretty much against legalisation for now, but he hasn’t ruled out decriminalisation just yet. This means the tight regulations routinely placed on marijuana could slacken under a Macron presidency, or perhaps eventually disappear. 

“His idea is to reduce the current fine of 3,750 euros down to a more lenient 100 euros, to be paid on the spot, rather than arrest the culprit and clog up the courts and jails,” writes High Times.

It all makes sense: In the two years after Colorado legalised Marijuana they saw a 12.8% decrease in homicides.

However, medical cannabis is also illegal in France, while more and more countries are recognising the drug’s medicinal properties.

A UK government regulator recently even labeled cannabis as having a “restoring” effect on those suffering from serious conditions such as epilepsy and cancer [via Metro.co.uk].

Only time will tell what’s in store for France’s future but for now, French fans of the green will be feeling better about the future after the election result.

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Loaded staff writer Danielle De La Bastide has lived all over the planet and written for BuzzFeed, Thought Catalog as well as print publications throughout the Caribbean.