Drugs

Cannabis Price Index Reveals Cost Of Weed In 120 Cities Around The World

By Jack Beresford

February 02, 2018

A new index detailing the cost of marijuana is 120 cities across the world has revealed the best and worst places on the planet for anyone looking to score some weed.

The 2018 Cannabis Price Index has been put together by Seedo, in an attempt to highlight the need for legislative reform when it comes to cannabis use across the world.

The index features a variety of cities where the drug is either legal, illegal or partially legal. As part of the research, they calculated the price of weed per gram, how much tax each city could be made on the drug (based on a comparison with tobacco) and how much it is currently taxed in legal areas.

Tokyo in Japan ranked as the most expensive at £22.86 ($32.66) per gram, while Quito in Ecuador was the least expensive at a jaw-dropping 94p ($1.34) a gram.  

To put those figures in some kind of perspective, cannabis costs around £6.44 per gram in London. That represented the most expensive price of all the UK cities included in the study, with Leeds offering the cheapest at £5.37 a gram, just ahead of Manchester (£5.52) and Liverpool (£5.56).

New York City, meanwhile, was revealed to be the city boasting the highest consumption rate of the drug at a whopping 77.44 metric tons a year.

The Index can be viewed, in full, below:

 

‏”This study has revealed some incredible insights into the kind of tax revenue that legalising weed could generate,” says Uri Zeevi, CMO at Seedo.

“Take New York City for instance, which has the highest consumption level in the study at 77.44 metric tons of cannabis per year. If they taxed marijuana at the average US cannabis tax level, the city could make $‏ ‏156.4‏ ‏ million (£109.48 million) in potential tax revenue per year. This is equivalent to providing nearly 3 months worth of free school meals to every single public school kid in New York City.” ‏

With both the US and UK governments seeking new ways to bolster the public coffers and pump some much-needed funs into the welfare system, increased legalisation represents an intriguing option.